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Psilocybin study

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Love Professor Nutt's job title mate.  Perhaps I can aspire to be a neuropsychopharmacologicalchronobiologist?

See you in the Queens Larder before the games kick-off?

-Lee

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Dr. Robin Carhart-Harris - Psilocybin and the Psychedelic State

Dr. Robin Carhart-Harris, of the Neuropsychopharmacology Unit, Imperial College London, discusses research on Psilocybin and how psychedelics could be used in therapy to help with depression, addiction, and other problems of rigid thought patterns.

Interview shot as part of forthcoming 3D Consciousness documentary.

Filmmaker: Matt Faw

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Research into the effects of MDMA on the resting brain to be shown on Channel 4

Imperial research on MDMA, the pure form of Class A drug ecstasy will be shown on two new science programmes this autumn.

http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/newsandeventspggrp/imperialcollege/newssummary/news_23-7-2012-15-42-26

Keith Allen defends "radical" drugs documentary

http://m.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-18855311

Lily Allen's father to take ecstasy on TV: Backlash over Channel 4's drugs stunt

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2174104/Lily-Allens-father-Keith-ecstasy-TV-Backlash-Channel-4s-drugs-stunt.html

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Can LSD cure depression?

Controversial research suggests that LSD and other psychedelic drugs could have vital medical uses.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/9565026/Can-LSD-cure-depression.html

Earlier studies have made surprising discoveries about what psilocybin, a class-A drug in Britain, was doing in the brain. These in turn could lead to new treatments for depression and agonising cluster headaches. says Carhart-Harris

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The Beckley Foundation/Imperial College

Psychopharmacalogical

Research Programme

http://www.beckleyfoundation.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/Beckley-Imperial-psychopharmacological-flyer-130402.pdf

Exciting new breakthroughs in the world of psychedelic research – a pioneering collaboration between Amanda Feilding, Director of the Beckley Foundation, David Nutt, Professor of Neuropsychopharmacology at Imperial College, London and Dr Robin Carhart-Harris, a Beckley Fellow at Imperial College

The Beckley-Imperial Programme works at the frontiers of research into psychoactive substances, their effects on the brain and consciousness, and their potential therapeutic benefits.

Our recent series of studies into psilocybin began in 2009 and used the latest brain-imaging technology (fMRI and MEG) to investigate changes in blood supply to the brain, correlated with changes in brain activity and subjective experience, when volunteers received an intravenous dose of the drug.

Â…

The findings raise exciting possibilities for the therapeutic use of psilocybin. One of the ‘hub’ regions, the medial prefrontal cortex, is known to be chronically over-active in depression. This same region has its activity throttled by psilocybin because its blood supply is reduced. Another region (the hypothalamus), which is over-active in the agonising condition of cluster headaches, also has its activity reduced by psilocybin through decreased blood supply. Thus our research has already thrown light on potentially valuable new avenues of treatment for both these debilitating conditions.

Â…

These insights have generated a major Medical Research Council (MRC) grant for a study into the use of psilocybin in the treatment of depression, which has recently received ethical approval. This is the first time a government body has funded psyche-delic research.

Â…

The recent findings in the Beckley/Imperial Programme demonstrate why it is essential to expand research into the therapeutic potential of currently illegal psychotropic drugs. The taboo on these substances, which comes from their illicit status, has severely impeded both scientific research into how these ancient medicinal and spiritually awakening compounds work, and clinical use of these substances for the treatment of some of modern man's many ills.

We ask all interested parties to help us develop and expand our programme of work. The time for this vital research has finally comeÂ…

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Still Fighting

Professor David Nutt Interview

http://www.vice.com/en_uk/read/david-nutt-magic-mushrooms-interview

Are there any other studies in the UK or Europe that are currently encountering roadblocks due to the difficulty of acquiring the product for clinical trials?

AbsolutelyÂ…

There are non-hallucinogenic derivatives of LSD, like 2-Bromo-LSD, that may cure cluster headaches – a terrible, terrible illness. We believe that it's outside the act. It’s not psychedelic, so why would it be controlled? But the Home Office takes the view that, because it’s got LSD in its name, they’ve got to control it.

That must be frustrating for you?

It's more frustrating for the people who are suffering. I got an email last week from a guy in Texas saying, “I suffered so much from cluster headaches that my son offered to kill me.” He said, “I now live in Mexico because in Mexico they allow you to use mushrooms for health reasons.” He was empowered to do that, but most people aren't. And I just hate to see suffering based on these lies about the drugs being too harmful to use.

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Professor David Nutt - Drug Science | London Real .

Mentions busting briefly, explaining “defence of necessity” at 42 minutes.

Psilocybin research at 48:00 – 56:40 minutes.

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