Jump to content

Which demand valve to buy?


Jrb3rd
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hello, newbie here. I've had the cluster 02 mask for years now and want to move up to a demand valve . I am looking at the Allied Healthcare/LSP demand valve and notice there is two different flow rate models. One is 40lpm and other is 160lpm...I am lost as to which model I need...could someone please help me? Thank you in advance!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would guess that 40 is plenty -- but wiser folks will give you a more definitive answer. (I could see the 40 at the Allied Healthcare site but not the 160.)

Will you do us/me the favor of letting us know how your purchase goes?  Do you have a DV prescription, or are you buying it without one?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You'll never use 160 lpm.....never...not even close. Is it possible to outrun 40 lpm? Possible but unlikely on a regular basis. 

If it's me....I buy the 160 if costs are the same.... Big difference in the price? Get the 40. 

As others have said, you can score on  eBay if you aren't needing it tomorrow.  Watch and wait.

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi and providing a bit of comparison.... before I purchased my demand valve from "Divers Alert Network" (DAN.org) I asked for some specs and this is what they provided.  The cover sheet started "Life Support Products" by Allied. 

A late edit here with a few details that may help others. 

A fellow CH suggested this particular demand valve and I purchased it in late 2019 in preparation for my "normal upcoming cycle;" however, the cycle never showed up.  At the end of the last cycle I had started the D3 regime and am giving that credit for the missed cycle.  (I am very glad to have the new valve unused!)  I tested the valve and could not get it to limit the flow and it stopped all flow as expected.  From reading the spec sheet, it appears to be 160 LPM model, but I am sure I would be satisfied with 40 LPM. 

My transaction with DAN.org was easy, no script, no questions.  The link is: https://apps.dan.org/dive-store/?id=39.  The current cost is $205.  Again, I have tested it, but have had little need for it.

Others with more experience with this particular valve may offer comment.

Be safe. 

DemandValveSpecs.JPG

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

My oxygen demand valve came with a 6-foot-long hose.  One end of the hose has a DISS connection sized for oxygen and connects to the regulator; the other end of the hose connects to the demand valve.  The Oxygen flow is: Tank, regulator, hose, demand valve, mask, patient.  Maybe another way to explain it is that the regulator needs to have the proper connections for both the tank and the hose; e.g., the regulator needs to have the DISS connection.

DISS connections are sized for the gas that is flowing to avoid connecting to wrong gas source. Also, the DISS fitting for the demand valve should not be limited by the regulator setting.

Scroll through this forum tread and I think that there are photos of a setup that might work for you.  https://clusterbusters.org/forums/topic/6632-demand-valve-o2/?tab=comments#comment-65652

I use E-tanks with a CGA870 connection to the tank.  Here is the regulator I use if that will help.  https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00ZVPR7NM/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Hope that helps and if not, keep asking......

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well.....It may be time to start talking about something that some find a lower cost option to a typical demand valve. 

I can't take credit for the initial find. I was asked by someone to evaluate an Amazon buy to see if it could be adapted to our uses. 

Before I go on.....the following should be considered solely as information and not a recommendation for use by me or anyone else for that matter. In other words, if you try this and it doesn't work as intended, it's not my fault because I'm not telling you that you should do any of this.

First....on Amazon we have this item. If you look closely, the provided hose is for scuba gear.....that's because that's what this device is sold as. BUT....if you happen to be surfing the web and end up here you will find a hose geared more towards our uses. If you find that one too short this one might be more your style. Now if you have a regulator such as this commonly found unit, your redneck, off label, completely unauthorized and not recommended by anyone demand valve setup is complete. Swap out the original hose for one geared towards our use and you're ready to roll. As with any O2 equipment, ALWAYS check for leaks and discontinue use until the leak is fixed.  Never use pipe tape on O2 fittings. Never. Just don't do it.

As with any set up....always turn the tank off when not in use.

I've used it briefly and a fine fellow in the northeast have been testing one I sent him for a few months with no complaints. 

 

Edited by Racer1_NC
additional info
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

.....i remember the first Texas Instrument handheld calculator i saw in the university bookstore....musta been 5 - $600 and weighed as much as a brick. figured some day i might be able to afford one (now they're givin them away like business cards). until this completely hypothetical "rig" came along i felt the same way about demand valves........thank you B, a fun and practical "build a model" project...

Edited by jon019
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...