The Blog

News Release: We Have Been Published

Another important step in our work has been taken and we’ve been published by a very well respected medical Journal and now available online at one of the most widely referenced medical publishing sites.

Getting this information not only published but made available through this outlet is a testament to the fine work completed by our team of researchers at Yale University, Dr.’s Schindler and Gottschalk and the late Dr. Sewell, the Clusterbusters Medical Advisory Board and specifically Dr. Robert Shapiro, and the hard and determined work of both Dr. Douglas Wright and Ms. Marsha Weil.

I am posting the abstract but the rest of the 11 page document is covered under copyright regulations. Feel free to copy the following ISSN and online info and pass along to your physicians for discussions on the topic. 😉

This study, it’s followed guidelines, results and subsequent publication moves our work a step past anecdotal reports and will be the basis for continued research studies

Thank you to everyone that took part in this study, all those that worked tirelessly for the last couple of years, and to all those that have supported our work.
Thank you for the work, the support, and the inspiration to keep moving forward.

Journal of Psychoactive Drugs, 47 (5), 372–381, 2015

Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

ISSN: 0279-1072 print / 2159-9777 online

DOI: 10.1080/02791072.2015.1107664

Indoleamine Hallucinogens in Cluster

Headache: Results of the Clusterbusters Medication Use Survey

Emmanuelle A. D. Schindler, M.D., Ph.D.a; Christopher H. Gottschalk, M.D.a; Marsha J. Weilb; Robert E. Shapiro, M.D.c; Douglas A. Wright, D.C.b & Richard Andrew Sewell, M.D.d

Abstract—Cluster headache is one of the most debilitating pain syndromes. A significant number of patients are refractory to conventional therapies. The Clusterbusters.org medication use survey sought to characterize the effects of both conventional and alternative medications used in cluster headache.

Participants were recruited from cluster headache websites and headache clinics. The final analysis included responses from 496 participants. The survey was modeled after previously published surveys and was available online. Most responses were chosen from a list, though others were free-texted.

Conventional abortive and preventative medications were identified and their efficacies agreed with those previously published. The indoleamine hallucinogens, psilocybin, lysergic acid diethylamide,
and lysergic acid amide, were comparable to or more efficacious than most conventional medications.

These agents were also perceived to shorten/abort a cluster period and bring chronic cluster headache into remission more so than conventional medications. Furthermore, infrequent and non-hallucinogenic doses were reported to be efficacious. Findings provide additional evidence that several indoleamine hallucinogens are rated as effective in treating cluster headache. These data reinforce the need for further investigation of the effects of these and related compounds in cluster headache under experimentally controlled settings.

The full article can be accessed here: http://www.tandfonline.com/…/…/10.1080/02791072.2015.1107664

Bob Wold

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